darksilenceinsuburbia:

Gregg Segal

7 Days of Garbage

The United States has a trash problem. According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the average American produces more than 4 pounds of garbage per day. That’s more than double the amount produced in 1960, and it’s50 percent more than the amount produced by Western Europeans. In January, photographer Gregg Segal decided to put some imagery to those numbers. His ongoing series, “7 Days of Garbage,” shows Californian friends, neighbors, and relative strangers lying in the trash they created in one week.

Some of Segal’s subjects volunteered to be a part of the project because they believed in the idea behind it. Others were compensated for participating. Generally, Segal strove to include people from a variety of socioeconomic backgrounds. And while the amount of garbage varies by person, there were some people who produced more garbage than they were willing to bring to the shoot. “Of course, there were some people who edited their stuff. I said, ‘Is this really it?’ I think they didn’t want to include really foul stuff so it was just packaging stuff without the foul garbage. Other people didn’t edit and there were some nasty things that made for a stronger image,” Segal said.

Website

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Gregg Segal

7 Days of Garbage

The United States has a trash problem. According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the average American produces more than 4 pounds of garbage per day. That’s more than double the amount produced in 1960, and it’s50 percent more than the amount produced by Western Europeans. In January, photographer Gregg Segal decided to put some imagery to those numbers. His ongoing series, “7 Days of Garbage,” shows Californian friends, neighbors, and relative strangers lying in the trash they created in one week.

Some of Segal’s subjects volunteered to be a part of the project because they believed in the idea behind it. Others were compensated for participating. Generally, Segal strove to include people from a variety of socioeconomic backgrounds. And while the amount of garbage varies by person, there were some people who produced more garbage than they were willing to bring to the shoot. “Of course, there were some people who edited their stuff. I said, ‘Is this really it?’ I think they didn’t want to include really foul stuff so it was just packaging stuff without the foul garbage. Other people didn’t edit and there were some nasty things that made for a stronger image,” Segal said.

Website

2headedsnake:

Daliah L. Ammar

(Source: daliahammar.com)

platmonde:

WWI Archive photos (1/2)

Photos taken from the English, French and German archives

(via darksilenceinsuburbia)

oxane:

Aspects of Nothingness by Paperworker 
Cut & paste collage (paper on old book cover).

oxane:

Aspects of Nothingness by Paperworker 

Cut & paste collage (paper on old book cover).

kvetchlandia:

Edward Steichen     Dancer Isadora Duncan at the Portal of the Parthenon, Athens,Greece     1921
"Once you really commence to see things, then you really commence to feel things." Edward Steichen

kvetchlandia:

Edward Steichen     Dancer Isadora Duncan at the Portal of the Parthenon, Athens,Greece     1921

"Once you really commence to see things, then you really commence to feel things." Edward Steichen

(via lushlight)

flashofgod:

Jeff Wall, Volunteer, 1996.

flashofgod:

Jeff Wall, Volunteer, 1996.

Tags: photography

arpeggia:

Jeff Wall - A Sudden Gust of Wind (after Hokusai), 1993

I went to Jeff Wall exhibition two weeks ago at the MCA and I enjoyed it very much. This one is my favorite.

Tags: photography

contemporaryartdaily:

Scott King at Between Bridges

Eros, the Greek god of love and sexual desire. Eros is usually depicted as a young winged boy, with his bow and arrows at the ready, to either shoot into the hearts of gods or mortals which would rouse them to desire. His arrows came in two types: golden with dove feathers which aroused love, or leaden arrows which had owl feathers that caused indifference. 

(Source: havishan)